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 31 
 on: March 11, 2019, 05:17:03 05:17 
Started by sadman - Last post by sadman
Hi

Although it is very famous design from electronics lab but recently Elektor launch it as kit, original design have some bug in it which was optimized by Audioguru at eevblog in this attachment i have added the schematic optimized by Audioguru and Elektor kit PDF document bonus added digital control of this power supply by a Russian forum and 10A version by the same forum. i like the digital control part of this power supply.

Regards
sadman

 

 32 
 on: March 10, 2019, 08:27:16 20:27 
Started by onest30 - Last post by pickit2
Hope you know what the word forum means.



Note: Account on Mute: system behalf of pickit2.
So I take that as a No?
 Muted Account

 33 
 on: March 09, 2019, 08:20:25 08:20 
Started by pickit2 - Last post by pickit2
I' am use 7.2sp6. I'm install on 7.2sp6 new version. Replace Bin and model original files and 7.4sp3 works...
 But simulation speed is slow..

I'm use RedAlert 's post files and spasbyspas 's crack..
Bad news!! Isıs is closed by oneself.. Embarrassed
Good Job bbarney closed you down.
Why still log in when your account is muted?

 34 
 on: March 09, 2019, 12:57:22 00:57 
Started by pushycat - Last post by pushycat
Ultrasonic Distance meter using Raspberry Pi -2 (EFY Jan 2017)
Ultrasonic ranging module HC-SR04 provides 2cm to 400cm non-contact distance measurement range. Its accuracy can reach 3mm with a cycle period of 50ms, which is the minimum time delay recommended before measurements are taken. The module includes ultrasonic transmitter, receiver and control circuit. Raspberry Pi 2 is a second-generation Raspberry Pi board, which was released in February 2015. It is a Linux based computer with a powerful Broadcom BCM2836 ARMv7 900MHz quad-core processor and 1GB SDRAM. It runs on 5V DC at 200mA and has 40 GPIO pins, along with HDMI, micro-SD card slot, Ethernet, USB 2.0 and 3.5 audio (out) ports.

Links are exclusively for Sonsivri members. Thus links are uploaded as attachment. Please do not share links in open forum

 35 
 on: March 08, 2019, 01:24:15 13:24 
Started by pushycat - Last post by pushycat
IoT-ENABLED AIR POLLUTION METER With Digital Dashboard On Smartphone (EFY Jan 2017)
Presented here is a project to monitor air quality on your smartphone using Blynk application and Arduino board. Blynk is an Internet of Things (IoT) platform to control Arduino, Raspberry Pi and the like over the Internet. In this project Blynk provides a digital dashboard on your smart phone that
displays real-time air quality readings for the immediate surroundings. Blynk is not meant for a specific board or shield. It will get you online and ready for
the IoT, irrespective of whether Arduino or Raspberry Pi is linked to the Internet over Wi-Fi, Ethernet or an ESP8266 chip.

Links are exclusively for Sonsivri members. Thus links are uploaded as attachment. Please do not share links in open forum

 36 
 on: March 08, 2019, 01:36:29 01:36 
Started by nullos - Last post by MetaMetal
..nightmare.. again.

V5.083 had gone out before v5.082 was published.
(In this forum)

Though I think that I use CCS-C easily
How about you?

 37 
 on: March 07, 2019, 09:10:00 21:10 
Started by Wizpic - Last post by wacks
From my understanding you also need to set the correct baud rate to use on those HC-05 modules.

[Arduino 1/Serial Device 1]  <==> [HC-05] ~~~~~ [HC-05] <==> [Arduino 2/Serial Device 2]

If you change the baud rate of Serial Device 1 and Serial Device 2 it will no longer match the baud rate of those HC-05 modules, hence you will see garbage data.

From the illustration below the data is already corrupted when the data has entered the first HC-05 module.
[Arduino 1/ Serial Device 1 @34800] <==> [HC-05 @ 9600] ~~~~~ [HC-05 @ 9600] <==> [Arduino 2/Serial Device 2 @ 34800]

The correct one is to use the same baud rate for all devices:
[Arduino 1/ Serial Device 1 @34800] <==> [HC-05 @ 34800] ~~~~~ [HC-05 @ 34800] <==> [Arduino 2/Serial Device 2 @ 34800]

To change the baud rate of HC-05 modules:

Connect the module's KEY pin (pin 34) to 3.3V

Use a terminal (adjust the baud rate to match the default 9600 of the module unless the module's baud rate has been changed before)

AT+UART? tell you the default baud rate. If you receive no response then the baud rate did not match the module

AT+UART=9600 set the baud rate to 9600.

AT+RESET reset and save changes.

Also note that some HC-05 modules (with breakout board) are rated 5V since the 3.3V voltage regulator and level translator are already incorporated on the breakout board.

Just my 2cents.

 38 
 on: March 07, 2019, 05:02:50 17:02 
Started by Wizpic - Last post by Wizpic
Sorry I had a quick skim through it, But will read it in depth, As I said before the Arduino is only for testing the linkage between the 2 HC-05 modules. I did change the serial.write to Serial.print and got more or less same rubbish in the serial terminal software. once I read through the link you mentioned I will test the software and see about getting it working that way just for fun but by connecting the  HC-05 to PCB and laptop I thought this should work as is as all the coding is done for that already.

I just thought becasue the PCB and laptop commitcate trough the serial port via a cable(which is already been pre set by the supplier)  that these HC-05 modules would just repalce the cable and send the same data via bluetooth, But the slight down fall is the range but should be ok as I'm nenver more than 5/10 feet away from the machine. I know that if you try and make your own serial commications you have to think about missing bits or ending the transmission and all about timing but that has already been taken care of by the supplier.


May be I've been looking at this all the wrong way

 39 
 on: March 07, 2019, 04:13:51 16:13 
Started by HackAndCrack - Last post by HackAndCrack
Learn Programming and Electronics with Proteus Visual Designer: A beginners guide to programming Arduino using Proteus Visual Designer Kindle Edition

available for free from March 18 2019 to March 22 2019

This eBook is not yet available online and hence I posted the link in General Electronics section.

Mods if you feel it should be moved to eBooks section then please do that.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Programming-Electronics-Proteus-Visual-Designer-ebook/dp/B07LG9SGWD/

 40 
 on: March 07, 2019, 04:04:41 16:04 
Started by Wizpic - Last post by kreutz
I guess you didn't read carefully the link I posted above:

"
To give you an example, if you were to send the letter A to an Arduino via serial and saved the incoming byte as myByte using code like that given above, the numerical decimal value of myByte would be 65. Try the following code and enter A in the serial terminal and you will notice that the number 65 is returned to the terminal and output to the screen because the Serial.print() function by default prints the decimal value of the byte.

byte myByte;
void setup(void){
   Serial.begin(9600); // begin serial communication
}

void loop(void) {
   if (Serial.available()>0) { // there are bytes in the serial buffer to read
      while(Serial.available()>0) { // every time a byte is read it is expunged
      // from the serial buffer so keep reading the buffer until all the bytes
      // have been read.
         myByte = Serial.read(); // read in the next byte
      }
      Serial.println(myByte); // print byte to screen
      delay(100); // a short delay
   }
  
}
If you want to instead print the ASCII character corresponding to myByte, use the Serial.write() function instead. You can also use an additional argument to tell the Serial.print() function to display the byte using the decimal, hexadecimal, octadecimal, or binary base numeral systems. The following code will take a byte read in from the serial terminal and print it to the terminal using these various bases.

byte myByte;
void setup(void){
   Serial.begin(9600); // begin serial communication
}

void loop(void) {
   if (Serial.available()>0) { // there are bytes in the serial buffer to read
      while(Serial.available()>0) { // every time a byte is read it is expunged
      // from the serial buffer so keep reading the buffer until all the bytes
      // have been read.
         myByte = Serial.read(); // read in the next byte
      }
      Serial.println(myByte, DEC); // base 10, this is the default
      Serial.println(myByte, HEX); // base 16
      Serial.println(myByte, OCT); // base 8
      Serial.println(myByte, BIN); // base 2
      Serial.write(myByte); // ASCII character
      Serial.println(); // carriage return
      delay(100); // a short delay
   }
  
}

(all of the above was copied and pasted here from my linked article)
"

Posted on: March 07, 2019, 03:49:17 15:49 - Automerged

Basically: Using Serial.println() you can specify what format data is being sent. Using Serial.write() you always send ASCII.


Posted on: March 07, 2019, 03:53:43 15:53 - Automerged

How your terminal software, in your laptop, displays the data is also important.


Posted on: March 07, 2019, 03:55:13 15:55 - Automerged

Read also how to configure the serial interface here:
 
https://www.arduino.cc/reference/en/language/functions/communication/serial/begin/

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