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 31 
 on: July 05, 2019, 02:45:19 14:45 
Started by zac - Last post by zac
Heating the glass would unfortunately negate a lot of the power you're generating. So, pulling the insulation out of your attic would probably not be a good idea.

Thinking out of the box...what about waxing the glass?

Or some other hydrophillic coating material (silicone oil, whale oil, ...)?

What angle from the horizontal is your array? Are these mono or poly cells? Knowing these might lend to some mechanical solutions.

The array is about 20 degrees from the horizontal and are mono cells.  I've tried rain-x, but it didn't seem to make much difference in helping the snow to slide off the panels.  So far, the most practical cost effective choice appears to be putting uv-stabilized pex pipe underneath the panels and circulating hot water through them to heat the panels when snow is imminent or falling.  I would probably go with a proplylene glycol solution in that case.

I would have to come up with a way to automatically turn on the heater and pump when I'm not home though based on forecast or falling snow. 

 32 
 on: July 05, 2019, 10:11:22 10:11 
Started by ajay r - Last post by ajay r
Countryindia
SiteNA
Notehobbyist

 33 
 on: July 04, 2019, 06:55:28 18:55 
Started by zac - Last post by solutions
Heating the glass would unfortunately negate a lot of the power you're generating. So, pulling the insulation out of your attic would probably not be a good idea.

Thinking out of the box...what about waxing the glass?

Or some other hydrophillic coating material (silicone oil, whale oil, ...)?

What angle from the horizontal is your array? Are these mono or poly cells? Knowing these might lend to some mechanical solutions.

 34 
 on: July 04, 2019, 06:20:49 18:20 
Started by zac - Last post by Parmin
@Parmin. Do your panels heat up at night?

No it does not, my system automatically cut out when the sun light goes below a certain level.

The panels that heated up are in chain in series with other panels that were not in the shade.
I conclude that since that shaded panel is not producing as high voltage as the others in the series, it become a resistor to the line and thus heating up when in the shade.

My suggestion is not to use the sun power to heat up the panels, instead to use external power (ie. feed power to the panels) to heat up the panels temporary until the snow melts and then resume the photo voltaic.  My thinking is that when it does snows the light level is too low to produce power anyway, so it might be better to use the time to heat up and clear the panels to prepare for sunny days.
This may or may not work, I never tried this nor do I have any background on being in the snow beside the occasional stolen time holidays to the mountains.

 35 
 on: July 04, 2019, 06:08:35 06:08 
Started by zac - Last post by towlerg
@Parmin. Do your panels heat up at night?

 36 
 on: July 04, 2019, 04:50:41 04:50 
Started by cihan22 - Last post by cihan22
CountryTurkey
SiteNA
NoteHello,
I'm students in electronics engineer , I would like to subscribe to this forum to share knowledge and projects,
I build simple devices mostly on PICs.
Please invite me in so I can share my thought.
best regards...

 37 
 on: July 03, 2019, 06:04:03 18:04 
Started by zac - Last post by Parmin
No snow where I am, but some of my panels are heating up by itself when they are in the shades since the chain generates power and teh one in the shade have slightly lower voltage and thus somehow represent a resistance to the flow.  I might be wrong in my surmision tho but this is actually happening.

So, I just wonder if reversing the flow of the current might actually heat up the panels enough to remove the snow and when the panels are clear you can put back the flow to normal and carry on.

 38 
 on: July 03, 2019, 03:39:50 15:39 
Started by lunacho12 - Last post by lunacho12
Countrymerida yucatan mexico
Siteconsultoresipmd.com.mx
Noteelectronic design

 39 
 on: July 03, 2019, 06:49:57 06:49 
Started by zac - Last post by towlerg
Out of the box. Clear snow from panels by tilting them with an actuator when weight increases. Or maybe modified windscreen wipers.

 40 
 on: July 02, 2019, 11:38:22 23:38 
Started by zac - Last post by Tekno1
A scientific paper posted today @sonsivri, describing a solution that solves snow building on Solar Panels with a good explanation of electrical details, hardware construction and field experiment results. Good part of the idea besides science is; it  triggers an avalanche of  the covering snow rather than melting it (so saving high energy).
   
" Re: IEEE Xplore Requests
« Reply #1123 on: Today at 12:41:05 PM »

Photovoltaic cell electrical heating system for removing snow on panel including verification "

http://www.sonsivri.to/forum/index.php?topic=10773.1100

Good luck.

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