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Author Topic: automatic watering system for pots  (Read 1962 times)
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esdrufao
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« on: July 30, 2012, 08:13:38 20:13 »

Hello fellow forum, continuing my learning and laziness more than anything makes me have to irrigate 5 plants that have my cousin in the living room, I decided to address a mounting easy both hardware and software.

 Gray matter is a simple assembly PIC 16F628A is enough if I want to extend you other sensors and pumps. The sensor is simpler than a toothpick, two pieces of galvanized wire 6/8cm in length is more than enough.

 No posting the outline that I have not done (is working on the coach), but if I leave a picture of the sensor. Grin



Also I leave the firmware made ​​in PBP

When I finish I go to make the scheme more detailed information.

 Greetings from Sarria, Lugo (Spain)
« Last Edit: July 30, 2012, 08:16:03 20:16 by esdrufao » Logged
chicane
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« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2012, 09:42:45 21:42 »

Don't know if you have seen this persons experimental sensor? Thought you might find it of interest

I haven't built it yet, was something I put aside to try sometime.

Take a look
http://www.cheapvegetablegardener.com/2009/03/how-to-make-cheap-soil-moisture-sensor.html
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Jef Patat
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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2012, 01:55:51 13:55 »

Don't know if you have seen this persons experimental sensor? Thought you might find it of interest

I haven't built it yet, was something I put aside to try sometime.

Take a look
http://www.cheapvegetablegardener.com/2009/03/how-to-make-cheap-soil-moisture-sensor.html

Nice one, that goes on my todo list.  I once built a basic sensor for my mother, think it was based on some Elektor article.  Then she decided to water my super high tech device as well, and that was the end.
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esdrufao
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« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2012, 11:01:49 23:01 »

 Hello Chicane , I'm testing the sensors and now works better than I expected.

Soon I'll upload all the information detailed in this show ... have patience which is still in test
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jiakoub
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« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2012, 10:40:32 10:40 »

i found this on the net it's very simple and works great for me, maybe someone will improve it.
for pads i connect 2 stainless still screws.
 http://www.b2cqshop.com/best/Q00115276-sch.pdf
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esdrufao
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« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2012, 11:10:18 11:10 »

It`s very interested  Shocked i go to mount in the breadboard and probe.

thank`s and sorry for my english
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jiakoub
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« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2012, 08:03:27 08:03 »

For Q1 i put a bc547.
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esdrufao
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« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2012, 03:57:15 15:57 »

hiyes i put a BC548c with good results  Grin thank´s for the note
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PeeJay
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« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2012, 07:11:45 07:11 »

If you can, try and use AC for gypsum block sensors. DC will cause electrolysis and eat away at your electrodes. The easiest way to do it is use a voltage divider, the middle goes to the ADC on your pic, and the + and - go to output pins on the pic. Then after you read the ADC value you swap the two output pins to be the other way around. ie high-low then low-high. I've seen this done with an AVR but I can't find the link.
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solutions
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« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2012, 07:51:04 19:51 »

Anyone know of a very low power, pulse on, pulse off, solenoid valve for water? Very low cost, of course.
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Parmin
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Very Wise (and grouchy) Old Man


« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2012, 12:43:44 00:43 »

Anyone know of a very low power, pulse on, pulse off, solenoid valve for water? Very low cost, of course.

Rather than solenoid, could you use a hobby servo motor?
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LabVIEWguru
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« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2012, 05:01:56 05:01 »

How about a pump for windshield washer fluid? I bought four of them at a hamfest last weekend for 1 dollar each. Really nice little pumps about one inch diameter and four inches on length. Ford Motor Company.
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solutions
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« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2012, 10:36:44 10:36 »

Rather than solenoid, could you use a hobby servo motor?


You could.

But those little plant water tanks you can buy have solenoid valves in them. They run on a 9V battery for four or five MONTHS.

I think they are magnetically latched. You hear a tiny click when it starts the drip cycle.

No idea where to get them.
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