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Author Topic: EMC Testing Lab (CE marking)  (Read 2073 times)
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Codeman
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« on: January 29, 2011, 11:15:03 11:15 »

Hello,
I have a comercial product that I want to certify acordingly to EMC directive (CE Marking)

I want to follow the self certification route, and I need a lab that can test my equipment.

Is there any fellow member here that works for such a lab, to give me some guidance?

TIA



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Sideshow Bob
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« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2011, 12:32:05 12:32 »

Have you looked at this site http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_compatibility Scroll down to yoy find the Specific topics section. In here you will find some good links. This may also be worth reading http://www.sonsivri.com/forum/index.php?topic=29883.0. You will find many books out on the web. The problem is that they are often to old
Here is some more links for ebooks
http://avaxhome.ws/ebooks/others/emc_product_designers.html (use mirror)
http://avaxhome.ws/ebooks/0863417566.html
http://www.copperinfo.co.uk/power-quality/downloads/pqug/612-fundamentals-of-electromagnetic-compatibility.pdf (short and good)

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Steve2010
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« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2011, 10:54:34 22:54 »

I dont work for a test lab but have quite a lot of experience in EMC testing and specifying test requirements. You will need to know what industry your product will be aimed at to specify the relevant test standards/test limits, etc. Commercial is probbaly one of the easiest to pass, while automotive, agricultural and Mil the hardest.
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bobcat1
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« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2011, 11:27:01 11:27 »

HI

I have walk this path several times in the past.

My good advice to you is as follow :

1) hire a professional EMC/EMI/ Safety (for several hour's,freelancer etc...) engineer who will looks at your design before you start testing your product at the lab.
2) fix your product & redesign it according to the EMC/EMI/safety engineer conclusion.
3) make your own test using a spectrum analyzer - hunt for EMC emission's form your product.
4) Go to lab test .

All the best

Bobi

  
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bigtoy
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2011, 09:33:04 21:33 »

This is a pretty old thread but I do agree with bobcat's advice. I bought an old spectrum analyzer off ebay and have found it very useful for finding and then "knocking down" the big emissions peaks. You can save a lot of money and time by doing this before you head to the lab for the final certification testing.
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Walkura
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« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2011, 03:00:36 15:00 »

I would also keep an eye on immunity, since most of the difficulty's arise during the burst test you can simulate (the budget way) using the inductor from the TL light's.
It's no burst generator (and it won't generate test reports for you) but if there is a sensitivity for high frequency disturbances its better to find them while your still at home.

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solutions
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« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2011, 03:10:10 15:10 »

you can simulate (the budget way) using the inductor from the TL light's.
I think you may know what's in your head as far as what you are talking about, but there are those of us who don't know what a "TL" light is, let alone where or how you are using this magical inductor.

More detailed info please

thanks
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Walkura
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« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2011, 04:10:05 16:10 »

I am sorry You are ofcourse right.
EMC is not just emission's the immunity part is just as important (and mandatory at least) here in Europe.
The budget way of simulating high voltage spike from the mains side is the inductor used in tube light's.
(like this one, the good old fashioned inductor) http://www.freestockphotosclub.com/objects/tube-light-choke-close-view/
We use this method at work regularly when we have problem's with reseting display's, microcontrollers etc.
Connect one side of the inductor to the minus (mains side) the second side You connect to a measuring cable which You use to touch the phase (just a brief touch) when You disconnect the measuring cable You will get high voltage spike's which are very well capable of causing reset's in micro's or display's or to scramble the display's data.
When You pass this method, You could give a real burst generator a chance.

Most electronics with an improper design that wouldn't make the IEC test's would get into trouble during the burst test's.
(although this is no guarantee, i seen problem's arise during more or less any test but most problems arise during burst tests (IEC 61000-4-4)

As always be very carefull when doing this, afterall You are generating high voltage spikes on the mains side.
Keep a good eye on isolation of cables and proper connection's etc. etc.
(and don't connect yourself by accident, You are working with mains voltage during these test's and connecting yourself can kill You)

If You are not sure on what You are doing, DO NOT TRY THIS, it might kill You.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 04:38:17 16:38 by Walkura » Logged
Codeman
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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2011, 01:57:05 13:57 »

Hi All,

The tube lights are a good idea, but probably the best way to control the is not by hand, but using some kind of solid state relay to connect the phase. I believe that you are using the inductor (I think the english name is balast) without any kind of load right? Inductor connected only on the mains side?

Regards

C.
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Walkura
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« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2011, 07:35:35 19:35 »

Hello Codeman.

Yes, we are using the inductor without any load attached to it, we use it to generate high voltage spikes to simulate the burst generator.
Maybe You could control it with a normal relay but i am not sure if that is fast enough, solid state relays (the ones i seen anyway) probably wouldn't survive this sort of spikes but maybe they exist for +1 kV.
Yes it is a ballast but i wanted to be sure that people wouldn't mistake it with modern electronic model's, we use the good old fashioned TL inductor.
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