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Author Topic: Transformer turns ratio  (Read 2162 times)
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max
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« on: July 04, 2010, 12:22:22 12:22 »

Hi friends,

What is the effect of turns ratio in a normal transformer?

Regards
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ppa88
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« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2010, 03:31:39 15:31 »

Not sure what exactly you want to know but it is the turns ratio which decides the ratio of secondary to primary voltage in an unloaded transformer. The secondary voltage reduces further after you start loading the transformer (due to internal voltage drops).

Hope that helps.
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glenndr_15
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« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2010, 05:46:03 17:46 »

Hi friends,

What is the effect of turns ratio in a normal transformer?

Regards

Greetings!
      Turn ratio is also a way to Identify a transformer if it is a "step-up  or step-down transformer".
Here is a formula Epri/Esec = Tpri/Tsec, where Epri = voltage in primary, Esec is the voltage in secondary, Tpri = number of turns in the primary, and the Tsec = number of turns in the secondary.
which means that the voltage in primary is directly proportional to the number of turns in primary, the voltage in the secondary is directly proportional to the number of turns in secondary.
       The primary to secondary turn ratio of step-down transformer have a turn ratio greater than one because it is from a higher voltage to a lower voltage, therefore based on the formula the Tpri have more number of turns than the Tsec.
       The primary to secondary turn ratio of a step-up transformer have a turn ratio less than one because it is from a lower voltage to a higher voltage, therefore based on the formula the Tpri have lesser number of turns compare to Tsec.
        If the turn ratio is equal to one it only means that the number of turns in primary and the number of turns in secondary is the same.

Best regards,
glenndr_15
« Last Edit: July 04, 2010, 06:07:40 18:07 by glenndr_15 » Logged
andig
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« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2010, 04:21:51 16:21 »

Hi,

This might come in handy for CRGO E-I transformers calculation. Thanks to the original author.

http://rapidshare.com/files/408980602/Transformer_Calculator.rar

Use my traffic no need for a rapidpro account.

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wakeke
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« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2010, 04:27:48 16:27 »

Greetings!
      Turn ratio is also a way to Identify a transformer if it is a "step-up  or step-down transformer".
Here is a formula Epri/Esec = Tpri/Tsec, where Epri = voltage in primary, Esec is the voltage in secondary, Tpri = number of turns in the primary, and the Tsec = number of turns in the secondary.
which means that the voltage in primary is directly proportional to the number of turns in primary, the voltage in the secondary is directly proportional to the number of turns in secondary.
       The primary to secondary turn ratio of step-down transformer have a turn ratio greater than one because it is from a higher voltage to a lower voltage, therefore based on the formula the Tpri have more number of turns than the Tsec.
       The primary to secondary turn ratio of a step-up transformer have a turn ratio less than one because it is from a lower voltage to a higher voltage, therefore based on the formula the Tpri have lesser number of turns compare to Tsec.
        If the turn ratio is equal to one it only means that the number of turns in primary and the number of turns in secondary is the same.

Best regards,
glenndr_15

In addition, the current ratio in relationship to the turns ratio of a transformer is Isec/Ipri = Tpri/Tsec. Notice that the current in the primary is inversely proportional to the turns in the primary. Thus we have this corresponding relationships: Tp/Ts = Ep/Es = Is/Ip.
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adidav
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« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2010, 10:47:17 22:47 »

This calculation are in general for general purpose transformers (50-60Hz) but for the SMPS transformers the calculation are more complicated. I think you want to know for the general purpose transformers?
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wakeke
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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2010, 06:18:52 06:18 »

He's asking for the normal transformers so basically it would mean the general purpose ones. (the ones with 3 nodes on each side, the primary & secondary, correct me if I'm wrong)
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