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Author Topic: Cable fault locating  (Read 1665 times)
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arash_tah
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« on: February 21, 2009, 04:45:45 04:45 »

Hi everybody
For my university project I want to work on "Cable Fault Locating" Is there any body
with this experience
please help
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titi
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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2009, 12:08:36 12:08 »

Hi,

May be this project can help you.

This project is for testing network cable, but can be modified for over use.

http://www.sbprojects.com/projects/utptester/utptester.htm

Best Regards.
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arash_tah
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« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2009, 01:35:16 13:35 »

titi
I mean power cable "63kv" not computer network cable
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looser
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« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2009, 09:29:26 21:29 »

Dear Arash_tah

If your need is just to check the continuation of wires and have the chance to short one end, check with a serial lamp at the other end. With this method no possibility to detect the place of broken wire.

Second, apply some high frequency ( 1 --2 kHz) of alternating current to one of the wires
( a second one  is to be used as the ground ) and use a high frequency detector while  moving along the wires. If the signal detected drops means you got the fault location. Here locate the non continued wire is quite occurate but use of hf detector requires a bit of experiment. Commercially these detectors sold in the market and are not expensive.

Third; is the last I can mention; measure the capacitance between two wires lying side by side     ( assuming there exist minimum two wires or better 3 and assuming the distance between two wires are constant along the wire; so is the capacity )  If the capacitance is known per unit length than the distance to broken wire section is the linear division of measured capacity to per unit capacity.
or compare the relative capacity of a wheatstone bridge measured to unit lengths.
Or compare the capacity between 1 to 2 and 1 to 3 or 2 to 3 for three wire system. Compare the faulty location as fraction of total length corresponding capacity ratio.

Hope you get an idea where to start.

Regards.

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tuvoj
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« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2009, 11:35:03 11:35 »

Hi

Try the tutorial on web-ee dot com under /schematics/instrumentation/time-domain-reflectometer... comes with a circuit from Tomi Engdahl.

Cheers, TuvoJ
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picavr
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« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2009, 11:55:06 11:55 »

for you
http://rapidshare.com/files/202740234/arash_tah_.rar.html
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mayli
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« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2009, 06:28:14 18:28 »

"picavr", please upload again. The link you post has been reached 10 times limited.
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picavr
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« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2009, 06:11:50 18:11 »

http://rapidshare.com/files/203266597/arash_tah_.rar.html
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