Sonsivri
 
*
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
December 03, 2016, 05:31:48 05:31


Login with username, password and session length


Pages: [1]
Print
Author Topic: 12F629 c0py  (Read 5072 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
fichamba
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 34

Thank You
-Given: 143
-Receive: 15


« on: February 26, 2008, 04:18:51 04:18 »

Hello everybody,

does somebody know if there are any chances to c0py a c0py pr0tected 12F629?. I need to modify the program inside with a slightly different values, and the original manufacturer doesn't wanna do it for me (even if I pay for it).

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

TIA!
Logged
tyildizak
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 16

Thank You
-Given: 7
-Receive: 7


« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2008, 08:45:20 08:45 »

You can't copy the code, it looks impossible, don't waste your time.
If you can write programs for pic, try to write a new program. 
Describe the device and the process, someone may help you.
Logged
sherm
Junior Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 44

Thank You
-Given: 14
-Receive: 9


« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2008, 10:41:42 10:41 »

There's plenty of documented information on how to remove code from copy protected chips. The common factor for all methods however requires that you have multiple items of the chip you want to get the data from since destruction is an inevitable part of the process until the code is removed. Even if you do get the code out, it's going to be in raw form that will need to be disassembled and even then you're going to have to spend a good portion of time figuring out the code produced. If you're capable of doing that, then you are probably capable of writing your own code to do the same task as the original chip.

What application is the chip you want to modify from?
Logged
shobits1
Junior Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 40

Thank You
-Given: 15
-Receive: 10


« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2008, 10:52:36 10:52 »

simplly you can't, don't wast your time.

if you can't write your own program, then at least describe what application is this chip for, maybe someone will help you.
Logged
baba
Guest
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2008, 11:00:36 11:00 »

Hello,
I hear that some company may retrieve the pic code even if code protected is not enabled but it is far to be free!
Even if you retrieve the hex file, you need to disassemble it and then add your code with the disassembled code.
If you are strong enough, you may create a high level C code based from the disassembled file and then add-modify this code, but it is a lot of works.

Here is some known companies that may remove the code protection of your mcu.
http://www.break-ic.com/
http://www.mcucrack.com/
http://www.semiresearch.com/
http://www.waferstar.com/en/index.shtml


I'm pretty sure that it is better to re-devellop your design and pic code with another company!
« Last Edit: February 26, 2008, 12:17:56 12:17 by baba » Logged
fichamba
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 34

Thank You
-Given: 143
-Receive: 15


« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2008, 11:35:12 11:35 »

Thanks a lot for all your feedback!

Maybe will be a better idea to post here the requirements (which, by the way, I think they're veeery simple for you, Masters of Programming...), rather than try to copy this small thing.

Also, if I had some examples to start from (to program it into this type of PIC), maybe I'll be capable of doing something by myself...but I'm not pretty sure of it...I'm an "old school" electronics engineer, and I have no experience in programming...only a big common sense...but I think it won't be enough to cope with this!. I have only a couple of Velleman programmers: the K8048 (PIC programmer & experimentation board), and the K8076 (PIC programmer board). Both supports several Microchip PICs, the 12F629 amongst them.

I'll write the requirements tonight. I hope somebody will help me.

THX again!!!
Logged
ktl
V.I.P
Newbie
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32

Thank You
-Given: 6
-Receive: 18


« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2008, 02:11:52 14:11 »

it costs lot money to break the copy protection.
12f629 only 4k flash memory & 8 pins.
use a Logic Analyzer to find out what it do.
program a new chip & test
Logged
fichamba
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 34

Thank You
-Given: 143
-Receive: 15


« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2008, 04:53:27 04:53 »

Hey ktl,

will you be able to do this programming?. I will describe what it does. For starters, it's a PIC for a remote controller (RF), with 2 channels, both independent, and there are 2 PICs actually: one in the transmitter, and one in the receiver. I can send you the specs privately if you can help me, because they're a bit long to post it here...or I can do a txt document and put a link to DL it from Rapidshare, for example.

Thx in advance for your help!

fichamba@yahoo.com
Logged
ktl
V.I.P
Newbie
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32

Thank You
-Given: 6
-Receive: 18


« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2008, 10:58:20 10:58 »

sorry!
i've sold my icd2 clone & recently busy in work.  Embarrassed
maybe u can do it by yourself.
Logged
LazBoy
Active Member
***
 Muted
Offline Offline

Posts: 154

Thank You
-Given: 72
-Receive: 25


« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2008, 11:06:37 11:06 »

12F629 has KeeLoq Cryptographic function,
if remote system using it, you need extra knowledge and license,
KeeLoq remote control system is special case,
otherwise no problem, somebody manage to do same project for you,

Logged
fichamba
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 34

Thank You
-Given: 143
-Receive: 15


« Reply #10 on: February 29, 2008, 11:26:40 11:26 »

Hi LazBoy,

indeed, it has a method (which, btw, I don't know if it's Keeloq or any other algorithm). Let me explain you: to make transmitter-receiver link, you must put transmitter in a "special" state in which it transmits to the receiver the random generated code in order to link each other. The manufacturer (Velleman), claims that it has more than 1000.000.000 combinations. You can also reset both units to a "factory default" code, but anytime you put it into "vinculation" mode, it will generate this random code and they'll stay in sync with the same code.

Moreover, they say that a receiver is capable of supporting up to 5 or 10 remotes (sorry, I can't remember it exactly now).

The Vellemans are: K8057 (reveiver), and K8059 (transmitter).

You will obtain more on this in:

Quote

and you can search for the K8057 & K8059 in the search field, to reach them the easy way.

There you can see all the specs and functions. Both Xmitter and Rcvr are based around a 12F629 Microchip PIC. That's really I'm needing, because I bought 10 kits of each unit, and I need to taylor to my special requirements. That's why I'm here; this is the most interesting forum I've found! You're great! I have ABSOLUTELY no knowledge in PIC programming...I can learn a bit, but, as you said, it requires special knowledge (even if it's not Keeloq-based programming!).

This post is for you and for anyone which can be of any help.

Thanks sincerely for all your time and efforts, and regards from Spain.

 Smiley
Logged
LazBoy
Active Member
***
 Muted
Offline Offline

Posts: 154

Thank You
-Given: 72
-Receive: 25


« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2008, 07:42:59 07:42 »

Quote
you must put transmitter in a "special" state in which it transmits to the receiver the random generated code in order to link each other. The manufacturer (Velleman), claims that it has more than 1000.000.000 combinations.

So this might be KeeLoq.. KeeLoq generates random code and transmits using PWM,
Microchip called KeeLoq as "Rock Solid Security", all information given by Microchip
after sign a license,


Logged
fichamba
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 34

Thank You
-Given: 143
-Receive: 15


« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2008, 02:12:10 14:12 »

So this might be KeeLoq.. KeeLoq generates random code and transmits using PWM,
Microchip called KeeLoq as "Rock Solid Security", all information given by Microchip
after sign a license,




...so I presume it will be definitely more complicated (apart from having the license for Keeloq code...).
Well, maybe it's time to make the question again: do you know how to do it, and if so, do you have an approximate idea of the cost? (including Keeloq license).

Just for my calculations, because sooner or later I'll need somebody to help me in this development, or to hire somebody, in other words. This is a must for me, so please, if you can (or somebody of you will), gimme an approximate quotation, because I have no idea of how much we're speaking about...

Again, thanx a lot!
Logged
LazBoy
Active Member
***
 Muted
Offline Offline

Posts: 154

Thank You
-Given: 72
-Receive: 25


« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2008, 09:50:57 09:50 »

I had try to learn something before but Microchip can't help personally requests.
So, as a firm, may be you able to sign license and get all necessary information
from them.
Logged
mayler
Junior Member
**
 Muted
Offline Offline

Posts: 68

Thank You
-Given: 14
-Receive: 13


Roger that!


WWW
« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2008, 04:49:10 16:49 »

The Keeloq algorithm attached. Hope it helps...
With this doc, A Israeli group decrypted a Keeloq car alarm system in about a day after 1 hour of probing (65000 plaintexts) and post processing in a dedicated computer system in 1 day...  Undecided
« Last Edit: March 06, 2008, 04:53:02 16:53 by mayler » Logged

Computer Engineer.
Digital IC Designer - Cadence certified.
Pages: [1]
Print
Jump to:  


DISCLAIMER
WE DONT HOST ANY ILLEGAL FILES ON THE SERVER
USE CONTACT US TO REPORT ILLEGAL FILES
ADMINISTRATORS CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR USERS POSTS AND LINKS

... Copyright 2003-2999 Sonsivri.to ...
Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC | HarzeM Dilber MC