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December 10, 2016, 11:12:45 23:12


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Author Topic: What is your opinion about my plans?  (Read 551 times)
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biomed12
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« on: June 15, 2016, 10:09:38 22:09 »

Hello sonsivri family,

I am so confused these days and i need some people's some advices they are really into software or hardware programming especially have master's degree in electronics or computer or software engineering.

I am studying biomedical engineering and have double major-electronics engineering-(22 years old). As you know, first and second year classes are almost same in each degree. I finished third year and almost have finished all of my lectures and i will be free during the nex year-it will be last- and i want to focus on programming. These days, i often think about "i must have studied computer engineering or maths science" because i realized that i love programming and computer, i hate biomedical engineering and health sciences. I can easly pass classes which are related to computer. My avarege point is now about 3.60/4.00 also.

My opinion is obviously that, I should work hard on computer sciences and my academic english during the next year. After i will be graduated, i should apply for an master's degree in computer sciences and i should go on this field. Is it possible or is there anyone who did like me at the past and can give me some advices? To give you an aspect, some of my bachelor classes are:

-physics I-II
-calculus I-II
-fundamentals of logic circuits
-C programming I-II
-Assembly programming
-Microcontrollers and applications (I-II)
-Diferantial equations
-Engineering maths
-Electronics circuits (I-II)
-Circuit theory I-II
-Logical circuit programming(with VHDL)
-Some labs..
-Digital signal processing and applications
-Signals and systems
-physiological control systems
-optimization methods
-design algorithms

etc..

THANKS!


« Last Edit: June 15, 2016, 11:15:54 23:15 by biomed12 » Logged
Parmin
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« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2016, 11:29:08 23:29 »

IMHO, any formal education is only good to get you a certificate to secure an interview to get a job.
Whatever that you enjoy doing is good since almost everything thought would most likely be obsolete as soon as you graduate.
It is up to you to explore your ability and sharpen your skill in whatever you are good at, to get the edge over your competitor and thus be successful.
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bobcat1
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2016, 09:46:01 09:46 »

Hi

Do your major in RF (radio frequency) engineering- this way you always have a work, and whether you work in R&D for some company's your experience will worth your weight in gold!

All the best

Bobi
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Gallymimu
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2016, 05:51:45 17:51 »

I don't think biomed is very marketable as a BS degree.  It's more of a systems level skill set and we see most students with biomed degrees having a much harder time finding starting positions.  It can be useful after more experience and when you are a project lead or systems engineer.

The nice thing about programming is it can be primarily self taught.  EE is getting easier to self teach with the internet but I still find programming more accessible.  So I always lean toward getting educated on the things that are harder to learn on your own.
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medik
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« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2016, 01:17:30 01:17 »

Hi,
I know how you feel at the moment. I was in similar situation 2-3years back, as a medical doctor in Africa with flare for technology and electronics, I wanted to do MS / PhD in Biomedical engineering(BME). But was worried about its marketability. After these years, I realized that I should major in Radiology as a doctor and also do Masters in Biomedical Engineering specializing in medical imaging. This was a huge relief because BME is broad, from tissue engineering, bio-material, bio-mechanics, medical electronics/ devices to imaging. Presently looking to apply to German universities for BME (medical imaging major).

For you, I would advise that you look for a specialization that fits your passion for computers in Engineering eg control engineering or even within Biomedical Engineering where programming and algorithms dominate.
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PICker
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« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2016, 06:10:22 06:10 »

I agree with Gallymimu, biomed is hard and needs (usually) R&D inside big companies. It is easier to have a wider approach (SW or HW) for having more chances. At the same time, if you have a specific biomed field in mind (i.e. neuromuscular stimulation, MRI, etc.), I suggest you to create a biomed-orientend curriculum. For the rest is a mix of luck, opportunity, ability, dedication and character.
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solutions
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« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2016, 08:53:44 08:53 »

You said you want to do s/w. To compete with the cowboys ("anybody can learn programming"), you need to apply your knowledge vs just being a codemonkey.

Write a slicer for biomed 3D printing apps. Right now, it's an ad hoc mess
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