Sonsivri
 
*
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
December 08, 2016, 11:00:33 23:00


Login with username, password and session length


Pages: [1]
Print
Author Topic: Chinese IR reflow oven for soldering PCB  (Read 833 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
bobcat1
Active Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 151

Thank You
-Given: 1126
-Receive: 29


« on: January 03, 2016, 08:12:18 08:12 »

Hi all

I interested in buying Chines IR reflow oven for soldering prototype PCB

Dose anyone have experiences with this type of oven and how good they are?

All the best

Bobi

Logged
perithess
Inactive

Offline Offline

Posts: 6

Thank You
-Given: 3
-Receive: 1


« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2016, 06:35:54 18:35 »

I would suggest to stay away from small chinese reflows. They don't heat evenly and usually burn the pcb. If you want a reflow for small production you can check at least one with moving belt and with several heating stages. I don't suggest the ones with steady drawer.
Best wishes
Logged
Ichan
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 840

Thank You
-Given: 312
-Receive: 387



WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2016, 09:41:11 21:41 »

Some people says that the T-962A is bad, but it woks well for me. Actually it is running more often than my 10KW conveyor type 3 stage reflow oven.

Remember that reflowing a board with part that have high heat capacity like big inductor or part with large shiny metal like connector always tricky even with conveyor type multi stage reflow oven.

Other easier way is to buy a kitchen oven which a fan inside (convection oven) and have top + bottom heater with total power about 1500W or more. Here is the general steps using this kitchen oven without building any controller:

- preheat the oven to 120 degree celcius
- put the board inside
- set temperature to 160 degree, wait for 1 minute
- set temperature to max (220 degree usually), wait for 2 - 3 minutes (do some test)
- set back the temperature to 120 degree
- open the oven door, wait it to cool (solidify) about 1 minute
- take the board out, put the new board in

That's a general steps, you better experiment with your oven (and solder paste) first.

-ichan
Logged

There is Gray, not only Black or White.
kayvee
Active Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 145

Thank You
-Given: 81
-Receive: 90


« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2016, 06:01:17 06:01 »

Small toaster ovens are reportedly good for this.  Strip out the standard controls and add a controller and you are good to go.

http://hackaday.com/2014/06/16/reflow-oven-controller-with-graphic-lcd/
http://www.reflowcontroller.com/
http://www.beta-estore.com/rkuk/order_product_details.html?wg=1&p=242
... plus many more out there.

It's all about getting the profile within the process window.

I would not use them for anything more than prototyping however.
Logged
zac
Junior Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 78

Thank You
-Given: 25
-Receive: 17


« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2016, 07:46:44 19:46 »

For reflowing a few boards, I found a conventional kitchen gas stove to be usable.  I support the boards off the bottom of a metal baking pan.  I haven't done it recently, but recall it took 20-30 minutes and I put in the boards after preheating.  If using an electric or toaster oven with exposed heating elements, you would need to shield the board with aluminum foil to prevent damage. 
Logged
Steve1542
Inactive

Offline Offline

Posts: 3

Thank You
-Given: 0
-Receive: 0


« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2016, 12:12:57 12:12 »

Hi,

My experience is: suitable for small PCB, average quality.
Personally I would not buy it, unless it really is for just a couple PCBs.
But then you could even use a heat gun (paint stripper type), gives similar results.

If you would like to do serious assembly/prototyping work, this may be interesting:
http://be.eurocircuits.com/shop/offtheshelf/product.aspx?ad=9524&ano=ec-reflow-mate&an=ec-reflow-mate&s=ec-prototype-equipment.

Good Luck.
Stef
Logged
Gallymimu
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 579

Thank You
-Given: 101
-Receive: 151


« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2016, 10:02:44 22:02 »

I also use a cheap kitchen convection toaster oven but my process is much simpler.

I found that the ramp soak controller can't keep up with the needed profiles but doing the following produces great consistent results.

for 63/37 leaded solder:
put boards in oven at room temp
turn on oven at full power
heat to 220 and immediately turn oven off
wait 1 minute and open oven door (temp will have peaked up a bit higher like to 230 or 240)
Logged
OscarH
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 33

Thank You
-Given: 72
-Receive: 7


« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2016, 10:51:06 10:51 »

Hi,
I'm using the same methodology than Gallyminou Galliminu, with minor fine tuning.

In my kitchen oven, when temperature reach 210C, I swith-off oven, so that with inertia it does not go above the 220C (or very little).
I leave the door closed for 45 seconds, then open it until board gets cooler.

It worked well on a couple of boards I found faulty (bad solders). It is ok for sporadic usage as 1/ you need to be in front of oven for manual control and 2/ wife does not like too much electronic cooking (but that's another topic, ;-) )

Please note some (cheap) plastic connectors trend to melt below 220C. In case of doubt, I remove them for board before the reflow...

Cheers. OH
Logged
Ichan
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 840

Thank You
-Given: 312
-Receive: 387



WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2016, 06:54:09 18:54 »

Pictures tells almost everything but numbers:
- baked well done in 6 minutes
- small parts at 4 minutes
- D2PAK parts at 5 minutes
- 12x12x10mm inductor at 5 min 30 sec
- add 30 sec more to make sure everything cooked well

Note that there is a flash light next to the oven, to verify if the the parts already cooked well or not.

-ichan
Logged

There is Gray, not only Black or White.
vern
Junior Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 62

Thank You
-Given: 7
-Receive: 10


« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2016, 03:28:28 15:28 »

I used to solder PCBs in a kitchen oven like the one above.
Worked very good! Even very complex BGAs (0.8mm pitch) and lead free.
How I did it (for lead free):
Heat the oven (with air circulation!) to about 250 - 260C. I had a cheap multimeter temperatur sensor installed with the sensor in the area where the board would be, because temperatur distribution is not very uniform in this kind of oven.
Put in the board with pliers, very careful!
Now start some timer, after about 3 minutes start to watch the board, use a flashlight, solder should slowly start to melt. Easy to see, fascinating!
After the last solder has melted give it another 20 seconds, than take the board out with the pliers and put it very carefully under a gentle fan. Voila!
I even did 2 sided boards.
I made a box from very thin aluminum to cover the top side that was already populated.
After putting the board in the in the oven with the bottom side up the hot air does not heat up the already soldered components fast enough to unsolder them.
Now you have to watch again and as soon as everything is soldered you take the board out and put it under the fan.
The board material (FR4) gets kind of soft when it is this hot, you want to use pliers that are not corrugated, because they would leave marks in the board.
Logged
Pages: [1]
Print
Jump to:  


DISCLAIMER
WE DONT HOST ANY ILLEGAL FILES ON THE SERVER
USE CONTACT US TO REPORT ILLEGAL FILES
ADMINISTRATORS CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR USERS POSTS AND LINKS

... Copyright 2003-2999 Sonsivri.to ...
Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC | HarzeM Dilber MC