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Author Topic: Yagarto - free ARM C compiler  (Read 5170 times)
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bigtoy
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« on: December 10, 2011, 01:25:14 01:25 »

I don't want to make this sound like an advertisement or anything. But I've recently switched from IAR to the new version of Yagarto http://www.yagarto.de/ and I'm a lot happier. Sure, Yagarto is a bit more work to set up; it's not all wrapped up and pretty like IAR is. But I'm pretty happy - I'm having a lot fewer unexplained things happening in my code, and it's nice to have a lot more control over it all. Just a thought for those considering an ARM C compiler.
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DarkClover
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« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2011, 10:31:36 22:31 »

What are the main differences or more the main advantages towards other free ARM compilers like ARM GCC?
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Mega32
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« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2011, 07:32:11 19:32 »

Yagarto is ARM-GCC based (and Free)
Last i checkked it was a nice package with build in OpenOCD support via Eclipse CDT

I'm using Codesourcery Lite , as i need Linux support.

But Yagarto is recommended in the windows world (even by Martin Thomas , who made WinARM)

It's a free and legal compiler for ARM , and well suited for most hobby and probably also commercial products.

But it can't produce as compact code as IAR

mega32
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bigtoy
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« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2011, 05:17:41 17:17 »

The reason I switched from IAR was pretty simple. I'd been using a <cough> evaluation version of IAR to try it out, and had a problem in my software where the processor seemed to be behaving strangely. I sent some code demonstrating the problem to tech support for the processor (a cortex-m3) and they determined it wasn't a processor problem at all - it was incorrect code generated by the IAR compiler. Oops! From there I went to codesourcery g++, and from there to Yagarto. I have spoken to other IAR users who have experienced similar problems, although I suspect those problems might possibly have been fixed in the latest versions. Of course no compiler, including the GCC-based Yagarto, is guaranteed perfect, but I've been happy and haven't seen any issues. As Mega32 points out, it is for Windows only.
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hate
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« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2011, 05:28:56 17:28 »

mega32: Assuming both have linux support, which one do u suggest, Yagarto or Code Sourcery? U may just consider the command line tools of both.

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bigtoy
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« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2011, 10:33:32 22:33 »

I'll let Mega32 give his opinion, but I'll give you mine.

I've used both CodeSourcery and Yagarto. As Mega32 pointed out, Yagarto is Windows only, so that might be a factor for you.

Yagarto and CodeSourcery Lite are very very similar. They are both distributions of GCC, along with the various GCC libraries. They are both command-line based. You can pay CodeSourcery (Mentor Graphics actually) for a GUI / IDE with nice debugger etc, or you can do it yourself using Eclipse or what-have-you for Yagarto.

I had been using CodeSourcery for a while, but they only release a new version of "lite" a couple of times a year. So depending upon when they release it versus when you grab it, it might be current or it might not be. I switched to Yagarto simply because Yagarto had done a new release, rolling in the latest GCC bugfixes, latest processors support, etc, whereas at that time CodeSourcery was looking a bit old. In terms of use, code generation, bugs (I haven't come across any), etc, I haven't found any difference between CodeSourcery and Yagarto. It's trivial to switch back and forth between them - they're both GCC. In Windows just change your PATH to point to one or the other - everything else (makefiles etc) can stay the same.
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hate
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« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2011, 04:05:32 04:05 »

Thnx for the review. So from what I understand, u say I can switch from one to another whenever a new version of either comes out. I think I'll stick to CodeSourcery as I'm using both Windows and Linux.

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max
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« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2011, 06:37:30 18:37 »

Hi ARM users,

Does ARM uc is available in real dip package not the dip module?
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Mega32
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« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2012, 08:57:05 20:57 »

@hate
I actually think bigtoys ansver is 90% equal to what my ansver would have been.

I am basically using codesourcery (lite) , because i'm dualOS'ed ... And have to.
Especially after they have been bought by Mentor (hhrrmmpfff) :-(

But they are (were ?) the company that is/was being funded by ARM , to develop
arm-gcc. And does a nice job.

Michael @ Yagarto , is actually doing an even more impressive job.
Maintaining his toolchain almost alone.

The path changing (changing toolchain version) on linux is done , by/via symlinking the wanted toolchain to my $HOME/arm-gcc directory.
Fast, Efficient and Easy

Mega32


Posted on: January 03, 2012, 08:52:33 20:52 - Automerged

Hi ARM users,

Does ARM uc is available in real dip package not the dip module?

AFAIK NXP is the only one that has one (announced one)
http://www.nxp.com/news/press-releases/2011/10/nxp-cortex-m0-microcontrollers-in-high-volume-tssop-and-so-packages-target-8-16-bit-applications.html

DIP vers
http://www.nxp.com/products/microcontrollers/cortex_m0/lpc1100l/LPC1114FN28.html

Mega32
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