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Author Topic: Possible to encrypt a DVD/CD?  (Read 1391 times)
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solutions
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« on: November 27, 2011, 02:16:27 14:16 »

Is there a way to encrypt the contents of a DVD or CD?

A folder to then go on a CD/DVD with other files?

A way to make these files invisible on the CD/DVD, ideally appear blank?

If so, what programs would you recommend for doing this?

thanks
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Parmin
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« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2011, 11:15:09 23:15 »

Reverse the (wiring of) spindle motor of the burner/reader of your CD/DVD
Data would ended up unreadable by normal driver.

You cannot make the disks to appear blank, because writing onto it would affect the reflection angle of the disk,
thus there always be tell tale visible that it was not blank.

Another way you MAY try is the dual layer disks, if you write to the internal layer only and leave the external layer blank.
Never try this but theoretically possible.
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solutions
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2011, 08:04:01 20:04 »

I meant appear blank as a directory, not visibly. Sorry about the ambiguity.

The inner layer write is intriquing though.
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Parmin
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« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2011, 11:06:06 23:06 »

You maybe could archive the files to do so.
Ie. archive your files into a container file (such as a molebox), rename the extension to whatever (DLL, ABC, SOL, etc)
and access them using a program that opens your archive.

It is just the fact that most archived file carry opening preamble that identifies it as an archive file that let the cat out of the bag.
You can then simply edit and trim out the tell tale code after archiving,
and add them back when you open the files.

You can also write a simple code splitter, that split each byte into separate files, and re assemble them when opening it.
Without the knowledge of the split alogarithm, opening these files would ended up with total garbage, regardless..

Encoding and cracking these kind of files are always FUN FUN FUN.. too bad I have not much time to do so lately.

Million way to lock, just need some patience and know how.
Its a jigsaw puzzle, up-sized and on viagra.. EXCITING!!



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LabVIEWguru
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« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2011, 04:45:58 04:45 »

Years ago, (I never owned one) the Commodore and the Atari computers had programmable drives. There was a command set to directly "talk" to the CPU in the drive, which gave way to all types of protection schemes. I wonder if there is a low level "standard command set" (other than the obvious) for CD/DVD ROMS?

I remember that the Radio Shack Color Computer would load into RAM an image of the directory sector when you did a DIR (directory) command. There were a couple hundred free bytes in the directory image - enough to allow you to change the interrupt vectors in the computer or change the address of the physical structure the "directory" command pointed to. After the DIR command finished, the computer "returned" to the new address that auto-loaded another small program from the drive. When you put a disk in, it looked as if it only contained a directory entry of a few bytes. Entire "protection" schemes were built around this.
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oldvan
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« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2011, 08:04:59 08:04 »

TrueCrypt files look like so much noise without the correct password.
With password they mount nicely as disk drives.

Open Source, so the sky is the limit...

http://www.truecrypt.org/
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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2011, 10:46:52 22:46 »

check this one also..
http://www.odinshare.com/hdd-encryption.html
can easily be found cracked...
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« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2011, 11:34:23 23:34 »

That TrueCrypt system definitely covers what I wrote above and more..

I never like mainstream crypt programs, because it is a KNOWN system thus are known to have certain weakness whatever it is that could be exploited.
I am very much so into writing my own that could be as obscure and obfuscated as I wish for.
If you like puzzle, these are the ultimate game.
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LabVIEWguru
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« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2011, 01:38:27 01:38 »

>I never like mainstream crypt programs, because it is a KNOWN system<

This argument has been around a long time. Many use open source cryptosystems because so many people use them, if there was a flaw in the code or a way to attack it someone would find it. Many suspect that commercial systems have secret "back doors," and this is why the governments allow such strong cryptosystems to be sold.

Of course, we don't have access to a Cray RS system, either.

Keeping your CDs in the microwave is supposed to insure security
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« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2011, 11:07:53 23:07 »

the 99.99999% secure method is to make a disc full of random numbers then XOR the data with the original

so, to use the end user would need both disks/files

there is no hack for this other than the encrypted disc and the decode disk

Of course someone could be spying on your disk writes so they could have a copy of your encode key.

Now to make it even better, use a different random stream the second time



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« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2011, 02:06:55 14:06 »

I meant appear blank as a directory, not visibly.

I do not know how the CD/DVD data structure, but thinking of making a fake empty "table of content" (FAT?) - while the data is actually exist.

-ichan
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